I wanna be a book but I was born a person, so I'll settle for an internet poet instead.

There are so many important things here. I'm trying to breathe them all in at once, to be a little bit a part of everything, so I'm sorry if I'm not entirely anything. But I'm trying. I'm no trailblazer. But I hope one day, the time comes for me to fight for what I believe in, and I take it.

I tag my posts with as many trigger warnings as I know. I'm only human and I might miss a few, so if I do, please please please let me know and I'll make a mental note. Thank you.

"I myself am made entirely of flaws, stitched together with good intentions."
- Augusten Burroughs

My writing is split into categories below. If you want to read them uncategorized, they're all available under the writing tag. Enjoy!

 READER(S)

 

sixpenceee:

As Yahoo News Reports: 

Zunera once dreamed of becoming a computer engineer. Instead, aged 16, she was tricked into prostitution in the UAE, beginning a four-year nightmare of cruelty, violence and rape.
Campaigners and officials say hundreds of young Pakistani women are also trafficked every year to supply the thriving sex trade in the brothels and nightclubs of Dubai. Zunera and her sister Shaista were two of them.
More than a year after she escaped, Zunera’s pain is still etched into her stumbling, hesitant voice — and also into her body, which bears the marks of countless beatings.
Vivid, angry scars run the length of her legs from ankle to hip, reminders of a botched operation after she was shot three times by the gang who trafficked her.
Zunera and Shaista managed to escape their tormentors in 2013 but still live in hiding in a two-room house in a slum, fearing revenge attacks. AFP is withholding their full names and precise whereabouts for their safety.
Their ordeal began in her hometown in Punjab province, when the family got into money trouble and a neighbour named Ayesha offered the sisters domestic work.
After a while Ayesha suggested she take the sisters to Dubai to work in her beauty parlour, getting fake papers to help the underage Zunera leave Pakistan.
Shaista is so traumatised by her experiences she can barely recount her harrowing ordeal.
Fighting back tears, Zunera revealed the horror that awaited them at Dubai.
"Ayesha took us to the lavatories at the airport and told us that we will be serving her clients for sex," Zunera told AFP.
"We started crying and then she told us that we travelled on fake documents and if we said anything we would be handed over to police right there."
Faced with no alternative, the sisters went with Ayesha, thinking they could just avoid having sex with clients.
"The first time, she herself was present in the room and made us do what the clients wanted. We were raped in front of her and with her assistance," Zunera said.
"She used to beat one of us and ask the other sister to talk on phone to our parents, threatening to kill us if we revealed anything about the brothel," Zunera recalled.
From time to time Ayesha brought the women back to Pakistan to renew their visas, frightening them into silence by telling them she would kill their whole families if they revealed the life they had been tricked into.
But eventually in March 2013 the sisters plucked up the courage to share their ordeal to their elder sister Qamar, who eventually obtained their freedom — but at a cost.

SOURCE & MORE INFORMATION
These are the events that keep me up at night and really scare me. 

sixpenceee:

As Yahoo News Reports: 

Zunera once dreamed of becoming a computer engineer. Instead, aged 16, she was tricked into prostitution in the UAE, beginning a four-year nightmare of cruelty, violence and rape.

Campaigners and officials say hundreds of young Pakistani women are also trafficked every year to supply the thriving sex trade in the brothels and nightclubs of Dubai. Zunera and her sister Shaista were two of them.

More than a year after she escaped, Zunera’s pain is still etched into her stumbling, hesitant voice — and also into her body, which bears the marks of countless beatings.

Vivid, angry scars run the length of her legs from ankle to hip, reminders of a botched operation after she was shot three times by the gang who trafficked her.

Zunera and Shaista managed to escape their tormentors in 2013 but still live in hiding in a two-room house in a slum, fearing revenge attacks. AFP is withholding their full names and precise whereabouts for their safety.

Their ordeal began in her hometown in Punjab province, when the family got into money trouble and a neighbour named Ayesha offered the sisters domestic work.

After a while Ayesha suggested she take the sisters to Dubai to work in her beauty parlour, getting fake papers to help the underage Zunera leave Pakistan.

Shaista is so traumatised by her experiences she can barely recount her harrowing ordeal.

Fighting back tears, Zunera revealed the horror that awaited them at Dubai.

"Ayesha took us to the lavatories at the airport and told us that we will be serving her clients for sex," Zunera told AFP.

"We started crying and then she told us that we travelled on fake documents and if we said anything we would be handed over to police right there."

Faced with no alternative, the sisters went with Ayesha, thinking they could just avoid having sex with clients.

"The first time, she herself was present in the room and made us do what the clients wanted. We were raped in front of her and with her assistance," Zunera said.

"She used to beat one of us and ask the other sister to talk on phone to our parents, threatening to kill us if we revealed anything about the brothel," Zunera recalled.

From time to time Ayesha brought the women back to Pakistan to renew their visas, frightening them into silence by telling them she would kill their whole families if they revealed the life they had been tricked into.

But eventually in March 2013 the sisters plucked up the courage to share their ordeal to their elder sister Qamar, who eventually obtained their freedom — but at a cost.

SOURCE & MORE INFORMATION

These are the events that keep me up at night and really scare me. 

hatzigsut:

very chilling topic on twitter right now. 

i have my own reasons for #WhyIStayed, and looking through this hashtag, i can see so many women and men who were lost, just as i was.

i stayed because it was the first time i felt important to anyone. he “loved” me. when he said he would die if i left him, i thought it passionate. when he started showing up unannounced at my house, because my friends told him my brother’s friends were over, i thought the jealousy was endearing.

then he tried to kill himself when i left town for two days. he was convinced that i would find someone else, in a town where i knew no one. i came back home, and promised i would never leave.

the manipulation and emotional abuse became physical—but only once. he slammed me against a wall after i made a joke about dumping him once i started college. i hid the bruises from my family, for weeks. that was the moment i decided to get out, no matter what happened. for some people, it only takes one time. others need more than one. and some people never make it out alive.

it is not always easy to “just leave.” it is a blessing if you are able to leave, with no consequences.

socialjusticekoolaid:

CNN has obtained a video, taken shortly after Michael Brown was shot, that shows a contractor who had been working near the shooting site describing the incident in a manner that matches other eyewitness testimony—raising his arms and shouting “man, he was going like this,” as if to suggest that Brown had adopted a posture of surrender before he died.

Two contractors are shown in the video, and both have spoken to CNN; one also spoke previously to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and one to Fox affiliate KTVI. The individual who is shouting and raising his arms in in the video told CNN that “the cop didn’t say get on the ground. He just kept shooting.” The other said that he saw officer Darren Wilson “chasing” Brown, that Wilson fired a shot at Brown while Brown’s back was turned, and that Brown raised his hands before he died, though it’s not clear at what point the witness saw Brown’s hands raised. (For what it’s worth, it seems like the worker who spoke to KTVI is the one wearing a pink shirt in the video and that the worker who spoke to the Post-Dispatch is wearing a green shirt.)

The CNN account notes that the workers are not from Ferguson and did not know the Brown family—a detail that could increase their perceived objectivity vis a vis witnesses from Brown’s neighborhood.

33 Days since Mike Brown’s murder, and his killer, Darren Wilson, is still a free man. How much more evidence is needed to make a fucking arrest?!  #farfromover #staywoke #ArrestDarrenWilson 

Anonymous asked
How can one manage to be happy with so much sadness and confusion in this world?

commovente:

mm. i’m not a very happy person as much as i am a very hopeful person. you gotta let yourself feel it all. the brief moments of happiness. the long blues. the white fuzz of uncertainty. experience all of it, but always with this final clear coat of hopefulness to soften every tiny and magnificent emotion. 

cbeamsglitter:

seriously though, imagine if commercials for “men’s” razors staunchly, fearfully avoided ever showing a beard or stubble or any trace of facial hair whatsoever, as if made in a bizarre and inexplicable alternate universe in which the thing their product exists to groom doesn’t exist

just dudes grinnin’ coyly as they mime running razors over their baby-bottom smooth jawlines, eyes glazed over, not knowing what it is they do, or why, knowing merely that they must

Suddenly her mom’s silence matched Jackie’s own. “Oh, my God,” she murmured in disbelief. “Are you gay?”

"Yeah," Jackie forced herself to say.

After what felt like an eternity, her mom finally responded. “I don’t know what we could have done for God to have given us a fag as a child,” she said before hanging up.

[…]

She got a call from her older brother. “He said, ‘Mom and Dad don’t want to talk to you, but I’m supposed to tell you what’s going to happen,’” Jackie recalls. “And he’s like, ‘All your cards are going to be shut off, and Mom and Dad want you to take the car and drop it off at this specific location. Your phone’s going to last for this much longer. They don’t want you coming to the house, and you’re not to contact them. You’re not going to get any money from them. Nothing. And if you don’t return the car, they’re going to report it stolen.’ And I’m just bawling. I hung up on him because I couldn’t handle it.” Her brother was so firm, so matter-of-fact, it was as if they already weren’t family.

You should read this Rolling Stones piece on Queer kids getting kicked out by their religious parents. And remember it.  (via fuckyeahdiomedes)

(Source: feministbatwoman)